Tailwheel endorsement

Talk about airplanes! At last count, there are 39 (and growing) FAA certificated S-LSA (special light sport aircraft). These are factory-built ready to fly airplanes. If you can't afford a factory-built LSA, consider buying an E-LSA kit (experimental LSA - up to 99% complete).

Moderator: drseti

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Warmi
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Location: Frankfort, IL

Re: Tailwheel endorsement

Postby Warmi » Sun May 10, 2020 1:30 pm

drseti wrote:
Warmi wrote:when it gets windy and gusty , I tend to work the stick quite a bit , I don't know what else I could do given that I am trying to maintain certain bank and being shifted left and right.


You can probably achieve the desired effect by holding the stick relatively stationary, and making those quick adjustments with just the rudder.

I know you were probably taught that the ailerons roll the wing, and the rudder corrects for adverse yaw. But, here's an alternate way of thinking: rudder yaws the nose, and ailerons correct for adverse roll.


I actually do use rudder 90% of time for yaw management during slow flight ( landing , take off etc ) and hardly every for adverse yaw since there is barely any on my plane :-)
Flying Sting S4 ( N184WA ) out of Illinois

3Dreaming
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Re: Tailwheel endorsement

Postby 3Dreaming » Sun May 10, 2020 1:41 pm

I often tell students that a quiet stick makes for a happy airplane. This is especially true with an airplane that has quite a bit of adverse yaw.

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Warmi
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Location: Frankfort, IL

Re: Tailwheel endorsement

Postby Warmi » Sun May 10, 2020 1:46 pm

Thanks guys for suggestions - I will definitely try to work more with the rudder.
Flying Sting S4 ( N184WA ) out of Illinois

3Dreaming
Posts: 2848
Joined: Sun Jan 10, 2010 6:13 pm
Location: noble, IL USA

Re: Tailwheel endorsement

Postby 3Dreaming » Sun May 10, 2020 5:41 pm

I have given around 150 hours of instruction in a J3 Cubs. I have also instructed in Champs, Taylorcrafts, and Luscombes. I have also done around 600 hours of instruction in Flight Designs. I threw that last on in there because it has some of the same tendencies. Any time you are moving the ailerons you need to be moving your feet. The amount may not be the same between airplanes. Proportionately it may be different at different speeds, but you have to move your feet. If you don't the airplane flies poorly. It can even effect the airplane while on the ground for take offs or landings.

That means if you are quickly moving the stick around like in the video, you also need to be moving your feet quickly as well.


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