Training Question

Sport aviation is growing rapidly. But the new sport pilot / light-sport aircraft rules are still a mystery to many flight schools and instructors. To locate a flight school offering sport pilot training and/or light-sport aircraft rentals, click on the "Flight School And Rental Finder" tab above. This is a great place to share ideas on learning to fly, flight schools, costs and anything else related to training.

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drseti
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Re: Training Question

Postby drseti » Sun Nov 03, 2019 2:59 pm

3Dreaming wrote:It doesn't say that the training must be after you hold a sport pilot certificate.
It doesn't say the training must be in a light sport aircraft.


Not explicitly. And remember, I'm not an attorney. But the rule starts with the words "If you hold a Sport Pilot certificate..." That is a conditional clause right at the beginning, which generally means that the condition applies to everything else that follows.

Now, I'm sure that's not what they intended when the rule came out, but it's what they wrote. Just another example that the Light Sport rules were not all that well thought out when written 15 years ago, and that amendments are still called for.

Your a member of NAFI correct?


Absolutely, and I'm very familiar with that document. But, except where it specifically quotes FARs, it represents just the opinion (or interpretation) of the folks at EAA and NAFI who prepared it. Remember, they're not attorneys either!
The opinions posted are those of one CFI, and do not necessarily represent the FAA or its lawyers.
Prof H Paul Shuch
PhD CFII DPE LSRM-A/GL/WS/PPC iRMT
AvSport LLC, KLHV
fly@AvSport.org
AvSport.org
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SportPilotExaminer.US

TimTaylor
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Re: Training Question

Postby TimTaylor » Sun Nov 03, 2019 3:04 pm

EyeInTheSky wrote:Thank you Tim and Paul. I got the feeling that the CFI had not been teaching a long time; I had asked him about his general teaching experience and he said that he assisted at another school. I realize that everyone has to start somewhere, and he appears to be a good person/communicator, so I don't mind hanging in there. My issue is the curriculum that the school has in place integrates the simulator with no specific time guidelines. When I asked about cancelling due to poor weather, he told me to show up anyway and we can do simulator work (the simulator is $65/hour in addition to the $65 CFI cost) and I don't get to count that as flight time towards the 20 hour requirement.

The other option is to go to another school in my area in class E airspace that is outfitted with a Cub, get training, pass the FAA practical, and then go back to the city school to get the 61.325 endorsement for controlled airspace. Which leads me to another question, can I get the endorsement using (for instance) a Cessna 150 with a CFI present or does it have to be in a LSA? The school with a Cub also has a 150.


Just for your information, class E is controlled airspace also. Only class G is uncontrolled airspace.
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TimTaylor
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Re: Training Question

Postby TimTaylor » Sun Nov 03, 2019 3:12 pm

I think it would be little difference in getting your training in a Piper J3 or Cessna SkyCatcher. They are both relatively easy to fly and I doubt one would take any more time than the other. I have lots of time in both. Personally, I would train in the airplane I intend to rent after I am licensed. If you can come to agreement with your CFI on your training syllabus, I recommend you do it in the C162. When you take your checkride, it will be the one and only airplane you have ever trained in and you will be totally familiar with everything about it. It is well equipped to get your certificate and your class B, C, D endorsement.

I would tell the CFI that you are operating on a budget. While you recognize there is some benefit to logging time in a simulator, your budget does not afford you the luxury of paying for time that does not go toward the FAR experience requirement for a Sport Pilot certificate. TELL him you will pass on the simulator training. TELL him you want 100 percent of your training in the C162.

I wouldn't say this to him, but that time and expense is not required for Sport Pilot and he can't force that on you. Maybe this FBO has another CFI you can use if he is unwilling to follow the Sport Pilot requirements.
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drseti
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Re: Training Question

Postby drseti » Sun Nov 03, 2019 3:39 pm

I notice that your signature line says:

Student Sport Pilot


I'm glad you're pursuing the Sport Pilot certificate, as it's both an excellent stepping stone to higher ratings if you should desire them downstream, and a worthy goal in it's own right if LSAs fit your mission. I just wanted you to be aware that, technically, you are a Student Pilot. Nowhere on it does a Student Pilot certificate say "sport", nor do the regulations make any distinction.

So, welcome aboard, student pilot! ;)
The opinions posted are those of one CFI, and do not necessarily represent the FAA or its lawyers.
Prof H Paul Shuch
PhD CFII DPE LSRM-A/GL/WS/PPC iRMT
AvSport LLC, KLHV
fly@AvSport.org
AvSport.org
facebook.com/SportFlying
SportPilotExaminer.US

RBearden56
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Re: Training Question

Postby RBearden56 » Sun Nov 17, 2019 8:44 am

A couple of Cessna 162 simulators are available. I have XPlane 10 and C162 that I use frequently. The panel is nor exact but is very close to how the aircraft flies and handles. There was another on You tube that was much more accurate in the interior details and I plan on looking in to that as well.

I would avoid using the 172 as a sim for the Skycather as they fly very differently, performance, take off and landing, control inputs are noticeability different. Most CFIs that have flow with me over control the aircraft, and as a student you don't need the confusion between two aircraft. Also cost per hour in a 172 is a lot more than the Skycather so he is adding cost to your training. :evil:

If possible, get your class D or C endorsement while training, as this becomes more natural to use and if you do your check ride in the same airspace you will be more comfortable on the COMs.

I have two friends that are Sport Pilot CFIs and if you want to see a syllabus, email me and I can send you one. And honestly, if you are not ready at 30 hours then your CFI does not have you focused on the right things. After I got my SPL, I went back to my CFI for advanced subjects like recovery for unusual attitudes and some basic instrument flight and GPS navigation, all for safety beyond the ticket.

Fly8MA has a great Sport Pilot Oral video on You Tube that is very helpful to prepare you that part of the exam.

One last thing, I would recommend you use Fore Flight and tracklogs for each training flight. Cloudahoy has a great debriefing option that allows you and your CFI to review each part of the lesson, speed, altitude, and heading are shown in a 3D flight path. This can be done on the ground where you can think about and discuss what was learned.

Best of Luck,
Randall Bearden
C162 Skycatcher N3037T
Sport Pilot
Light Sport Repairman Maintenance Aircraft
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Sling 2 Pilot
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Re: Training Question

Postby Sling 2 Pilot » Sun Nov 17, 2019 9:35 am

You stated, “this school is big and advertises Sport Pilot program”. Well, IMHO, you need to speak to management (Chief Pilot) ASAP. Failure to do so, again, IMO, will result in your expenditure of an unwarranted amount of instruction and cash.

No way, a school, big or small, advertising SP instruction hand you off to a CFI, in their employ, who is not familiar with instructing for a given rating/certificate.


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