New sport pilot Light-Sport Aircraft Rules 2010

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Paul Hamilton
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New sport pilot Light-Sport Aircraft Rules 2010

Postby Paul Hamilton » Sat Jan 30, 2010 7:37 pm

The long awaited sport pilot rules from the NPRN are soon to be out.

Should be Published to the Federal Register as law early February.

Here is a first look.

Maximum altitudes
Sport Pilots can now fly above 10,000 feet above sea level or if they need to be over terrain or mountains it is now 2000 feet AGL, whichever is higher. The 2000 feet above ground level was added. Per new § 61.315

Minimum Altitudes
If the operation is conducted without hazard to persons or property on the surface—
a powered parachute (PPC) or weight-shift-control (WSC) aircraft in non congested areas may be operated at less than 500 feet from any person, vessel, vehicle, or structure. This was only for helicopters before but now PPC and WSC was added. Per new §91.119 Minimum safe altitudes

No Make/model set of aircraft. 61.323 gone now and all related rules for it for pilots and instructors. It is now split up for light sport aircraft speed endorsements for an above 87 knots aircraft and now new below 87 knots endorsement for the low mass, high drag, slower speed aircraft per 61.327 for pilots and 61.423 for flight instructors.

No additional knowledge test when changing categories for private pilots and sport pilots per 61.63

Sport Pilot Student certificates are extended from 24 months to 60 months. Per 61.19 came out later 2009 but is a significant change.

Ultralight experience deadline to be able to use ultralight time as FAA recognized dual training time. Ultralight time only good for one more year towards sport and private pilot licenses per 61.52

Student sport pilots pre solo training added, if the aircraft is the faster above 87 knots and equipped with flight instruments, will have to have Instrument training (flight by reference to instruments) for solo cross country per 61.93

Clarified some weight-shift control and PPC private pilot requirements and privileges in Subpart E – Private pilots.

Cut down the dual training time required 60 days before the checkride from 3 to 2 hours for airplane and WSC, and down to 1 hour for a PPC.

I am going to have a video up on this at www.beasportpilot.com soon. See “Ask the Expert” on left hand side with “New FAA Rules”

What they proposed but did not do, withdrawn as they say:

Withdrawn: Replace sport pilot privileges with aircraft category and class
ratings on all pilot certificates (proposal 1)
Withdrawn: Replace sport pilot flight instructor privileges with aircraft
category ratings on all flight instructor certificates (proposal 2)
Withdrawn: Remove current provisions for the conduct of proficiency
checks by flight instructors and include provisions for the issuance of
category and class ratings by designated pilot examiners (proposal 3)
Withdrawn: Place all requirements for flight instructors under a single
subpart (subpart H) of part 61 (proposal 4)
Withdrawn: Require 1 hour of flight training on the control and
maneuvering of an airplane solely by reference to instruments for student
pilots seeking a sport pilot certificate to operate an airplane with a VH
greater than 87 knots CAS and sport pilots operating airplanes with a VH
greater than 87 knots CAS (proposal 5)
Withdrawn: Remove the requirement for persons exercising sport pilot
privileges and flight instructors with a sport pilot rating to carry their
logbooks while in flight (proposal 6)
Withdrawn: Remove specific regulatory provisions (under proposed
§61.324) for endorsements for the operation of powered parachutes with
elliptical wings (portion of proposal 7)
Withdrawn: Add a requirement for student pilots to obtain endorsements
identical to those proposed for sport pilots in §61.324 (portion of proposal
17)
Last edited by Paul Hamilton on Sun Jan 31, 2010 1:43 pm, edited 1 time in total.
Paul is a Sport Pilot CFI/DPE and the expert for ASA who writes the books and produces the DVD's for all pilots flying light sport aircraft.
See www.SportAviationCenter.com www.Sport-Pilot-Training.com and www.BeASportPilot.com to Paul's websites

KSCessnaDriver
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Postby KSCessnaDriver » Sat Jan 30, 2010 10:08 pm

Would you care to get us a link to a government website showing that the NPRM has indeed gone final? I've yet to see it, and its not listed on the FAA NPRM website, thus I feel like it might be best to not speculate.

Care to educate us with more than telling, and some showing?
KSCessnaDriver (ATP MEL, Commerical LTA-Airship/SEL, Private SES, CFI/CFII)
LSA's flown: Remos G3, Flight Design CTSW, Aeronca L-16, Jabiru J170

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drseti
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Re: New sport pilot Light-Sport Aircraft Rules 2010

Postby drseti » Sat Jan 30, 2010 10:56 pm

Paul Hamilton wrote:The long awaited sport pilot rules from the NPRN are out.

<snip>

Sport Pilots can now fly above 10,000 feet above sea level or if they need to be over terrain or mountains it is now 2000 feet AGL, whichever is higher. The 2000 feet above ground level was added. Per new § 61.315



This one is a wonderful and much needed change. It won't affect flatlanders, and will improve safety immeasurably for the folks in the Rockies. This is the same provision that FAA had for rec (pronounced "wreck") pilots, and it never made any sense to me that they denied terrain clearance to sport pilots.
The opinions posted are those of one CFI, and do not necessarily represent the FAA or its lawyers.
Prof. H. Paul Shuch, Ph.D., CFII, LSRM-A/GL/WS/PPC, iRMT
AvSport of Lock Haven
fly@AvSport.org
http://AvSport.org
http://facebook.com/SportFlying

ibgarrett
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Postby ibgarrett » Sun Jan 31, 2010 12:44 am

I'll second that for the Sport Pilots along the Rockies. I've been training out of Erie CO, which is only about 10 to 15 min from the foothills where the terrain rises very fast. The 2k AGL rule definitely is going to make going west MUCH easier.

I'm still going to take a course specifically for flying in the mtns before I head that direction. :) Gotta know what I'm getting in to.
Brian Garrett
brian@garrett.net

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drseti
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Postby drseti » Sun Jan 31, 2010 8:39 am

ibgarrett wrote:I'm still going to take a course specifically for flying in the mtns before I head that direction. :) Gotta know what I'm getting in to.


Good idea. I wouldn't mind at all if FAA mandated a mountain flying checkout and logbook endorsement, just as they did for Class B, C, and D airspace. Meanwhile, I hope all Sport Pilots follow your excellent lead.
The opinions posted are those of one CFI, and do not necessarily represent the FAA or its lawyers.
Prof. H. Paul Shuch, Ph.D., CFII, LSRM-A/GL/WS/PPC, iRMT
AvSport of Lock Haven
fly@AvSport.org
http://AvSport.org
http://facebook.com/SportFlying

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Paul Hamilton
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Postby Paul Hamilton » Sun Jan 31, 2010 1:41 pm

KSCessnaDriver wrote:Would you care to get us a link to a government website showing that the NPRM has indeed gone final? I've yet to see it, and its not listed on the FAA NPRM website, thus I feel like it might be best to not speculate.

Care to educate us with more than telling, and some showing?


I should have said "about to hit" rather than "are out".

Should be able to post FAA link in a couple of days.
Paul is a Sport Pilot CFI/DPE and the expert for ASA who writes the books and produces the DVD's for all pilots flying light sport aircraft.

See www.SportAviationCenter.com www.Sport-Pilot-Training.com and www.BeASportPilot.com to Paul's websites

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Paul Hamilton
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Postby Paul Hamilton » Mon Feb 01, 2010 6:06 pm

Paul Hamilton wrote:
KSCessnaDriver wrote:Would you care to get us a link to a government website showing that the NPRM has indeed gone final? I've yet to see it, and its not listed on the FAA NPRM website, thus I feel like it might be best to not speculate.

Care to educate us with more than telling, and some showing?


I should have said "about to hit" rather than "are out".

Should be able to post FAA link in a couple of days.


It is offficial!
I have posted the official FAA link and published a video blog also at
http://beasportpilot.com/category/new-faa-rules/
Paul is a Sport Pilot CFI/DPE and the expert for ASA who writes the books and produces the DVD's for all pilots flying light sport aircraft.

See www.SportAviationCenter.com www.Sport-Pilot-Training.com and www.BeASportPilot.com to Paul's websites

SP_Laser
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Postby SP_Laser » Thu Apr 22, 2010 12:02 pm

Any word regarding Electric Engines for LSAs?
________
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Last edited by SP_Laser on Tue Feb 08, 2011 4:52 pm, edited 1 time in total.

roger lee
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Electric Engines

Postby roger lee » Thu Apr 22, 2010 2:00 pm

Hi Laser,

Flight Star which also distributes Flight Design does have a Flight Star plane with an electric motor. They are finishing up on some details, but should be available soon. Electric motors and batteries aren't cheap.
Roger Lee
Tucson, Az.
LSRM-A, Rotax Instructor & Rotax IRC
(520) 574-1080 (Home) Try Home First.
(520) 349-7056 (Cell)

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CharlieTango
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Re: New sport pilot Light-Sport Aircraft Rules 2010

Postby CharlieTango » Thu Apr 22, 2010 3:15 pm

drseti wrote:
Paul Hamilton wrote:The long awaited sport pilot rules from the NPRN are out.

<snip>

Sport Pilots can now fly above 10,000 feet above sea level or if they need to be over terrain or mountains it is now 2000 feet AGL, whichever is higher. The 2000 feet above ground level was added. Per new § 61.315



This one is a wonderful and much needed change. It won't affect flatlanders, and will improve safety immeasurably for the folks in the Rockies. This is the same provision that FAA had for rec (pronounced "wreck") pilots, and it never made any sense to me that they denied terrain clearance to sport pilots.


Wonderful is too strong a word, don't get me wrong I need this change more then any other pilot flying under sport pilot rules that I know of and I'm glad for the change.

What I am disappointed about is the language. If stickly complied with the language still leaves the sport pilot balancing compliance and safety.

To get an altitude exception that provides for reasonable terrain clearance the MEA provides a good basis. If the sport could fly within 500', 1000' or even 1,500' of the MEA he could fly both strait line to a waypoint as well as at a consistent altitude for a period of time.

http://skyvector.com/?ll=37.62405555555 ... =16&zoom=3 Look at my local enviorment, the MEA in my quadrant is 13,500' and in adjacent quadrants it is 14,600, 10,900, 13,500 and 14,600. The problem with the 2,000' agl exception is that you have to divert your route to follow ridges that you can climb at the same rate as or you have to encounter lee side rotors in the worst possible places to stay within the 2,000' exception at all times.

In the west you might need the 10,000' exception multiple times in a single leg of your flight. If you have to divert to follow the terrain as well as descend over each valley and climb over each mountain range the exception becomes hard to comply with and still encourages exposure to danger in order to comply.

A simpler way to say it would be that a sport pilot can now cross or access all terrain but he cannot climb to a safe altitude before he approaches the high terrain. The initial climb to safe altitude really needs to be done over lower terrain. With the new language a pilot has to expose himself to some degree to get in the zone where he can climb above 10,000'

SP_Laser
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Joined: Fri Dec 07, 2007 1:36 pm
Location: Hermosa Beach, CA

Re: Electric Engines

Postby SP_Laser » Fri Apr 30, 2010 2:09 pm

roger lee wrote:Hi Laser,

Flight Star which also distributes Flight Design does have a Flight Star plane with an electric motor. They are finishing up on some details, but should be available soon. Electric motors and batteries aren't cheap.


This question is regarding Light Sport Rules.

Unless I am mistaken, the currently exclude electric aircraft.
(prior to these new rules)
________
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Last edited by SP_Laser on Tue Feb 08, 2011 4:52 pm, edited 1 time in total.

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Paul Hamilton
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Re: Electric Engines

Postby Paul Hamilton » Tue Jul 20, 2010 11:32 am

SP_Laser wrote:
roger lee wrote:Hi Laser,

Flight Star which also distributes Flight Design does have a Flight Star plane with an electric motor. They are finishing up on some details, but should be available soon. Electric motors and batteries aren't cheap.


This question is regarding Light Sport Rules.

Unless I am mistaken, the currently exclude electric aircraft.
(prior to these new rules)


In FAR 1.1 in the definition of a LSA (6) a single, recipricating engine if powered.

That is pretty limiting for the electric. I would suggest EAA asa vehicle to change or get some deviation to make it a LSA
Paul is a Sport Pilot CFI/DPE and the expert for ASA who writes the books and produces the DVD's for all pilots flying light sport aircraft.

See www.SportAviationCenter.com www.Sport-Pilot-Training.com and www.BeASportPilot.com to Paul's websites

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Paul Hamilton
Posts: 359
Joined: Mon May 21, 2007 2:42 pm
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Re: New sport pilot Light-Sport Aircraft Rules 2010

Postby Paul Hamilton » Tue Jul 20, 2010 11:53 am

CharlieTango wrote:
drseti wrote:
Paul Hamilton wrote:The long awaited sport pilot rules from the NPRN are out.

<snip>

Sport Pilots can now fly above 10,000 feet above sea level or if they need to be over terrain or mountains it is now 2000 feet AGL, whichever is higher. The 2000 feet above ground level was added. Per new § 61.315



This one is a wonderful and much needed change. It won't affect flatlanders, and will improve safety immeasurably for the folks in the Rockies. This is the same provision that FAA had for rec (pronounced "wreck") pilots, and it never made any sense to me that they denied terrain clearance to sport pilots.


Wonderful is too strong a word, don't get me wrong I need this change more then any other pilot flying under sport pilot rules that I know of and I'm glad for the change.

What I am disappointed about is the language. If stickly complied with the language still leaves the sport pilot balancing compliance and safety.

To get an altitude exception that provides for reasonable terrain clearance the MEA provides a good basis. If the sport could fly within 500', 1000' or even 1,500' of the MEA he could fly both strait line to a waypoint as well as at a consistent altitude for a period of time.

http://skyvector.com/?ll=37.62405555555 ... =16&zoom=3 Look at my local enviorment, the MEA in my quadrant is 13,500' and in adjacent quadrants it is 14,600, 10,900, 13,500 and 14,600. The problem with the 2,000' agl exception is that you have to divert your route to follow ridges that you can climb at the same rate as or you have to encounter lee side rotors in the worst possible places to stay within the 2,000' exception at all times.

In the west you might need the 10,000' exception multiple times in a single leg of your flight. If you have to divert to follow the terrain as well as descend over each valley and climb over each mountain range the exception becomes hard to comply with and still encourages exposure to danger in order to comply.

A simpler way to say it would be that a sport pilot can now cross or access all terrain but he cannot climb to a safe altitude before he approaches the high terrain. The initial climb to safe altitude really needs to be done over lower terrain. With the new language a pilot has to expose himself to some degree to get in the zone where he can climb above 10,000'


I live north of you on the lee side of the big mountains. For this reason I went Private pilot. However if I had a choice of putting myself in danger such as flying into a leeside rotor to meet some regulation, SORRY I would follow 91.3 (b) and consider it an emergency and not intentionally fly into a rotor and lose control of the aircraft.

This may not help your overall flight planning but use common sense while flying to not put yourself in danger.

The rule states 2000 AGL but I feel this is open to interpretation, just like all the rules. I think the intent allows some climbing and descending and not following the terrain exactly such as diving to follow steep terrain or a cliff. I feel some transition is appropriate. But this is how I interpret which an attorney and plenty other may say different.
Paul is a Sport Pilot CFI/DPE and the expert for ASA who writes the books and produces the DVD's for all pilots flying light sport aircraft.

See www.SportAviationCenter.com www.Sport-Pilot-Training.com and www.BeASportPilot.com to Paul's websites


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