Yesterday's Sting Flight to 12,500 ft.

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drdehave
Posts: 381
Joined: Fri Apr 13, 2012 10:45 am
Location: Davis, CA

Yesterday's Sting Flight to 12,500 ft.

Postby drdehave » Sat Jan 28, 2017 1:14 pm

Flying over California's monstrous snow pack!
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XebiEZG2mck

Sting Flight (Flying the Sting LSA)
http://www.youtube.com/user/9162069934/featured

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FastEddieB
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Joined: Wed Jan 07, 2009 9:33 pm
Location: Mineral Bluff, GA

Re: Yesterday's Sting Flight to 12,500 ft.

Postby FastEddieB » Sat Jan 28, 2017 6:31 pm

You are a gifted cinematographer.

Seriously.

Thanks for sharing.
Fast Eddie B.
Sky Arrow 600 E-LSA • N467SA
CFI, CFII, CFIME
FastEddieB@mac.com

sandpiper
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Location: Independence, Oregon
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Re: Yesterday's Sting Flight to 12,500 ft.

Postby sandpiper » Sat Jan 28, 2017 9:45 pm

Good job! I enjoyed that.
John Horn
Independence Airpark (7S5), OR
CFII, LSRM-A
Rotax Service, Maint, and Heavy Maint. trained
Flying a CTSW, building an RV-12

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drdehave
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Joined: Fri Apr 13, 2012 10:45 am
Location: Davis, CA

Re: Yesterday's Sting Flight to 12,500 ft.

Postby drdehave » Sun Jan 29, 2017 1:21 pm

No formal flight plan, or flight following, but I leave a "game plan," including ETAs, with folks at home. I like freedom to adapt and adjust when way up there, which is just what I had to do on this flight, when I found myself with throttle buried, nose up, ground speed at 65 knots, and I was loosing 700 fpm! Of course the plane has its ELT and a PLB--and radio is always set to "on-guard" 121.5. Beyond all that, I sometimes monitor weather for days, so I'm going on the absolute "perfect" day; If I get up there and it's not, I abort and come home. But I must say, when you're at 12K and as far as you can see in all directions is 30-ft-deep snow, it does tend to tighten something up...
Sting Flight (Flying the Sting LSA)
http://www.youtube.com/user/9162069934/featured

RTK
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Re: Yesterday's Sting Flight to 12,500 ft.

Postby RTK » Sun Jan 29, 2017 8:39 pm

drdehave wrote:... when I found myself with throttle buried, nose up, ground speed at 65 knots, and I was loosing 700 fpm!


Oooh, I'll bet that introduced a pucker factor! But beautiful flight and glad that you had enough altitude to get away from that downdraft. I have to admit that flying over mountainous areas are something that I'm not well practiced at, so I am at awe of your flights and videos. Thanks for sharing!

Warmi
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Re: Yesterday's Sting Flight to 12,500 ft.

Postby Warmi » Tue Feb 14, 2017 1:03 pm

drdehave wrote:.... But I must say, when you're at 12K and as far as you can see in all directions is 30-ft-deep snow, it does tend to tighten something up...


Yeah, on the other hand, 30-ft deeps snow makes for soft landings ... just look at this guy's story :D

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ivan_Chisov

With the air battle still raging around him, Chisov intentionally did not open his parachute, since he feared that he would be an easy target for an angry German pilot while he was dangling from his parachute harness. He planned to drop below the level of the battle, and open his chute, when he was out of sight of the fighters. Due to the thin atmosphere at that altitude, however, he lost consciousness and was unable to pull the rip cord.

Chisov struck the edge of a snowy ravine at an estimated speed of somewhere between 190 and 240 km/h (120 and 150 mph), then slid, rolled, and plowed his way to the bottom. The aerial battle had been seen by cavalry commanded by General Pavel Alexeyevich Belov. When Chisov was seen falling to the ground, cavalrymen rushed to the site, and were surprised to find Chisov alive, still wearing his unopened parachute. Chisov regained consciousness a short time later.

Chisov suffered severe injuries, including spinal injuries and a broken pelvis. He was operated on by surgeon Y. Gudynsky, and for a month his condition was considered critical. Despite his injuries, he was able to fly again three months later.
Flying Sting S4 ( N184WA ) out of Illinois


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