LSA and Experimental Stall Speeds

Paul Hamilton is one of the first persons to become a DPE (Designated Pilot Examiner) for sport pilots. As a full-time author and sport pilot expert, he writes books and produces DVD's for Aviation Supplies and Academics (ASA). Now Paul has graciously agreed to answer your questions here. Thanks Paul! For more information about Paul, please visit www.Paul-Hamilton.com and www.Sport-Pilot-Training.com.

Moderators: drseti, Paul Hamilton

User avatar
dstclair
Posts: 1006
Joined: Thu Mar 06, 2008 11:23 am
Location: Allen, TX

Postby dstclair » Wed Feb 16, 2011 9:16 am

This is somewhat irrelevant to a SP but a certified sport-pilot eligible plane may be flown IFR if properly equipped by an appropriately rated pilot. ASTM doesn't have an IFR standard for LSA at this point.
dave

comperini
Posts: 237
Joined: Sun Feb 24, 2008 10:37 am
Location: California

Postby comperini » Wed Feb 16, 2011 9:54 am

dstclair wrote:This is somewhat irrelevant to a SP but a certified sport-pilot eligible plane may be flown IFR if properly equipped by an appropriately rated pilot. ASTM doesn't have an IFR standard for LSA at this point.


Unless its certificated in the S-LSA category, and the manufacturer says "no" to IFR flying (or night flying for that matter).
- Bob
COMM, CFI, DPE, Light Sport Repairman/Maintenance
http://www.sportpilotinstructor.com

3Dreaming
Posts: 2268
Joined: Sun Jan 10, 2010 6:13 pm
Location: noble, IL USA

Re: LSA and Experimental Stall Speeds

Postby 3Dreaming » Wed Feb 16, 2011 10:06 am

comperini wrote:
drseti wrote:This does not make it an LSA.


Why wouldn't it? 14 CFR 1.1 defines a light sport aircraft, and pretty much says that any aircraft (regardless of how its certificated) is a light sport aircraft, if it meets all the requirements as defined there.


You are correct that CFR 1.1 lumps them all together, but other parts of the CFR's distinguish between Standard catagory, S-LSA, and E-LSA. The way the aircraft is certified makes a big difference in how and who can maintain the aircraft. I think the correct way to say it is it meets the requirements of a Light Sport Aircraft, because that is what the sport pilot needs.

User avatar
drseti
Posts: 5671
Joined: Sat Nov 28, 2009 6:42 pm
Location: Lock Haven PA
Contact:

Re: LSA and Experimental Stall Speeds

Postby drseti » Wed Feb 16, 2011 10:44 am

comperini wrote:I just like keeping the number of terms to a minimum. That's my only reason for "voting" for the use of the term light-sport aircraft when referring to anything that meets that definition.


Bob, what you say makes perfect sense -- from the pilot's perspective. The reason I emphasized the different terms is that it makes a big difference from a maintenance point of view. I've had students go for the LSA repairman certificate, thinking they could use that to work on their Champ, Cub, or 'Coupe. Not so! :cry:
The opinions posted are those of one CFI, and do not necessarily represent the FAA or its lawyers.
Prof H Paul Shuch
PhD CFII DPE LSRM-A/GL/WS/PPC iRMT
AvSport LLC, KLHV
fly@AvSport.org
AvSport.org
facebook.com/SportFlying
SportPilotExaminer.US

comperini
Posts: 237
Joined: Sun Feb 24, 2008 10:37 am
Location: California

Re: LSA and Experimental Stall Speeds

Postby comperini » Wed Feb 16, 2011 10:59 am

drseti wrote:I've had students go for the LSA repairman certificate, thinking they could use that to work on their Champ, Cub, or 'Coupe. Not so! :cry:


I hear ya! I've seen the same thing, with people who confuse the light-sport repairman certificate with the repairman certficate issued for an amateur-built plane, thinking they are interchangable.
- Bob

COMM, CFI, DPE, Light Sport Repairman/Maintenance

http://www.sportpilotinstructor.com


Return to “Ask The Examiner”

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 1 guest