Different Classes of Sport Pilot

Finally, a place for sport pilot instructors and/or wannabees to talk about instructing.

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drseti
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Re: Different Classes of Sport Pilot

Postby drseti » Sat Mar 23, 2013 4:14 pm

In the case of my one "fat ultralight" pilot, he just bit the bullet and did his training and checkride in the SportStar. That way, two years later, he had no problems doing his flight review in it too. In between, he flew his 1-place CGS Hawk a lot, and seems to really enjoy it. As Jack often reminds us, the aircraft required all depends on the mission.
The opinions posted are those of one CFI, and do not necessarily represent the FAA or its lawyers.
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Flim63
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Re: Different Classes of Sport Pilot

Postby Flim63 » Wed Apr 10, 2013 2:06 pm

"Fat ultralights" were allowed to become ELSA in the window that ended a few years ago. Now, you can have either N-numbered aircraft or a part 103 legal ultralight. The FAA considers fat ultralights paperweights. You cannot get a SP license and be legal to fly a 280# non-registered vehicle, even if the n-numbered plane next to it is identical in every regard.

Jason

ps also the single-pilot rule is a limitation placed on a Sport license, not a different category of license. The training has to be dual and PTS list those task elements that can be evaluated from the ground. Later the pilot can have a DPE fly with them in a dual aircraft and do a complete PT and have the limitation removed.

pps I was going to keep quiet on another item but... Just because someone flew ultralights 20 years does not mean safe. Nothing can replace the hours of proper dual instruction. They may have gotten proficient at getting their ultralight around the patch, but some mistakes you can't learn from 'cause the lesson plan killed you. We train and practice power-off stalls at 3000 ft because practicing them where they occur is fatal.

ppps (last one, promise) I'm not really a bitchy person but being new, I'm reading all the old posts and, well I've got a pocket full of 2 cents.


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